Friday, May 08, 2015

Methods of Escape, and Distractions

"Escape is not a dirty word.  
Nobody can face what's happening head-on all the time.  
It's all right to pretend sometimes.
The only danger lies in pretending that you're not pretending."
--Sheldon Kopp
I have a friend who often reminds me of this quote. 
Odd as it sounds, I had an opportunity for escape today as we waited
to get my blood work done, my port accessed,
and finally, almost two hours late,
started my chemo.
It's been harder the last couple of times
and I've been dreading this weekend.
Plus, we got caught in traffic last night 
and what should have been a two and a half hour drive
turned into nearly took nearly five and a half hours,
taking out about an hour to stop
for dinner and a potty break.
Anyway, during the in-between times,
I took a few pictures and thought about escape and distractions.
How useful they can be.
Just remember what it is you are doing
and don't forget to come back and face reality! 
  
Puzzle pieces at MD Anderson. 
There are always several in progress in all the waiting areas.
One of many methods of providing distraction.

Some seem to find distraction in weaving a noose. 
Or is it a rudimentary crown for some battle weary warrior?
A woman came and plopped down in the chair.
I wondered if she noticed the noose/crown.

Others find distraction in taking pictures of death and decay.

But also there are living flowers, and that always feels hopeful to me.

The fish distracted me on the morning 
I waited for my first surgery in late October, 
and again as I waited for my surgery to install my port. 

And the sundial area, on the floor below the gazebo area.
I took this one from the floor above. 
My husband suggested going upstairs when I complained
that I couldn't get a good shot
while standing beside it. Don't know why I didn't think of that myself!

The barrier wall to keep one from falling over the edge was glass.
I had to lean over a bit and hold my phone camera out over the open area.
I felt a little nervous and unbalanced,
as though I were walking on an edge
and about to fall off. 
I'm not gonna lie to you:
it is a feeling with which I am intimately familiar.

10 comments:

  1. I will be glad when you are not familiar with that feeling. I like all of the pics but love the crown one.

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    1. Thanks, Mindy! One more to go!

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  2. This is beautifully composed. It needs to be a book.

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  3. Reach for His hand, Annie, and walk on the water. You're as good with words as you are with pictures....

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  4. That's a great and helpful quote! I love seeing and hearing your perspective about the things you notice. Smart and thoughtful people adding distractions for others!

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  5. Lovely. My distractions have always been about control. Pretending that controlling the controllable would help me control all the rest. You ambling and contemplating and enjoying.

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    Replies
    1. I think we all want to think we can control more than we can, Patti! Cancer sometimes messes with our perception of what we can control. In my case, it messed with my sense of stability.

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